Skip to main content

Brittany S's library guide: Home

About Me

 

 

 

Hello! My name is Brittany...

I am a third year psychology major with a minor in communication studies.

Contact Info

Email: ...@ufl.edu

Phone: (***) ***-****

Favorite Databases

My Topic

How does living in low-income communities affect children's education?

Navigating the Databases

First Video: Global Warming

Reference Article

References

 I used  RefWorks to create my references list because it's quick and easy. I used the APA 6th Edition citation style because I'm a psychology major and that's the format we use as social scientists to cite references.

 

 

References

Evans, G. W. (2004). The environment of childhood poverty. American Psychologist, 59(2), 

      77-92. doi: 10.1037/0003-066X.59.2.77

Serpell, R., Baker, L., & Sonnenschein, S. (2005). Becoming literate in the city : The 

     baltimore early childhood project. Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University 

     Press.

Zigler, E., & Styfco, S. J. (2001). Can early childhood intervention prevent delinquency? 

     A real possibility. In A. C. Bohart D. J. Stipek (Ed.), (pp. 231-248). Washington, DC, US:

     American Psychological Association. doi: 10.1037/10433-011

Teach for America. Retrieved from 

     https://www.teachforamerica.org/our-organization/special-initiatives/early-

     childhood-education

  

 

Annotations

Evans, G. W. (2004). The environment of childhood poverty. American  

     Psychologist, 59(2), 77-92. doi: 10.1037/0003-066X.59.2.77

Dr. Evans is a peer-reviewed Cornell University scholar who specializes in childhood poverty environmental analysis. His article discusses the widespread environmental inequalities that children who live in poverty face. He also discusses the inferiority of low-income schools and day-cares. He argues that an accumulation effect of multiple environmental risks that children in low-income communities face has a lasting negative impact on their lives. His viewpoint on childhood poverty is a widely shared theme among scholars. His standpoint on environmental risks brings illumination to the many horrors of childhood poverty and their lasting effects.

 Serpell, R., Baker, L., & Sonnenschein, S. (2005). Becoming literate in the city : The 

     baltimore early childhood project. Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University 

     Press.

Dr. Serpell, Baker, and Sonnenschein are credited Cambridge university scholars. In their book, they report the results of their five-year longitudinal study of children’s early literacy development based on culturally diverse backgrounds. The children were enrolled in Baltimore, Maryland public schools and were studied from pre-k to third grade. The book helps to understand literacy development of children from diverse backgrounds. Because this study was performed in Maryland, it may be biased in relation to literacy development of children in other parts of the United States. However, it brings attention to the relationship of cultural and literary development and gives a solid building ground for further research in this area.

Zigler, E., & Styfco, S. J. (2001). Can early childhood intervention prevent delinquency? 

     A real possibility. In A. C. Bohart D. J. Stipek (Ed.), (pp. 231-248). Washington, DC, US:

     American Psychological Association. doi: 10.1037/10433-011

Dr. Zigler and Styfco are Yale scholars with an extensive background in early childhood development. This chapter in their book focuses on the benefits of early intervention in troubled children. They also discuss the dangers to society presented by troubled youth. Their findings support what most other scholars believe in that the earlier the intervention, the better the chance of preventing a life of crime for youth. This chapter in particular highlights the increase in youth-related crimes and the lasting benefits of reach-out programs.

Teach for America. Retrieved from 

     https://www.teachforamerica.org/our-organization/special-initiatives/early-

     childhood-education

Teach for America is a nationally accredited organizational website that focuses on outreach for at-risk youth in low-income communities. Studies have shown the huge educational gap between children in poverty and their wealthier counterparts. This student-powered organization sends college graduates into the heart of these low-income communities to help teach and close the educational gap. 

Call Number Ranges and Subject Headings

Call Number Ranges:

  • LC65-67.68 Economic aspects of education
  • LC68-70 Demographic apects of education
  • LC230-235 Parent-teacher associations. Home and school associations

Subject Headings:

  • Education - Educating the young child
  • Low-income - Low Income Families' Empowerment through Education (Organization)
  • Childhood - Childhood Development

Library Workshop- Refworks 2.0

The Refworks 2.0 workshop I attended was very informative. I used to dread making a references sheet, because I would never remember the right format for APA. Keeping up with all my different resources was also cumbersome. After attending this workshop, manual references sheets and disorganized resources is a thing of the past. I am now able to have an instant reference sheet and keep up with all my resources through the use of Refworks. Now doing research and writing papers is so much easier.

In the workshop, I made a Refworks account and learned how to navigate it. I learned how to save various resources and then import them to Refworks. I also learned how to make folders for my different resources in order to keep them organized. From those various folders of resources, I learned to make a reference sheet. It’s so convenient that Refworks has so many different citation styles. I also loved the write and cite feature of Refworks. We explored that somewhat in the workshop. Write and cite is also very convenient. Especially when using APA style, as I do so often, it automatically puts the in-text citations into your paper wherever you direct it to.  It also does footnotes, which I never use in APA but could come in handy later, and it also makes a reference sheet.

I’m so glad I attended the Refworks 2.0 workshop. It has made my research life so much easier. I have been using it ever since I took the workshop and I plan on using it whenever I have to do research.

University of Florida Home Page

This page uses Google Analytics - (Google Privacy Policy)

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.