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Clinch Family Papers--Sample Letters: Letters of

The Clinch and McIntosh families, related by marriage, were prominent in the settlement of northern Florida in the early 1800s. Their letters document life at their plantations and service during the Second Seminole War.

Letter from Eliza Clinch to D.L. Clinch, undated

Master D. L. Clinch

Mobile Point

Fla

 

Saturday Morning

 

My dear little Brother

 

            Mama went out shopping yesterday, where she saw that stone dog, which you liked so much when you were in town last, and which you beged [sic] her to buy for you. Mama got it, which I was very glad of, as I know, that little mischievous fellow Bayard, cannot break it. I suppose you have eaten up all the candy which mama sent you, which I expect you were very glad to get. Mary got a set of cups and saucers, which she intends taking out to school with her. I want to see you all very much, though. I could not tell which one I want to see most, as I want to see all. I hope when I see you next, you will be able to read very well for me, as well as tatty also - you must be a good and dear little son to mama when we are all gone as you must [xxxxx] that now you are the oldest at home and that mama depends entirely on you. I would have written to tat and Hal if I had had time but as I had not time and as you are now the gentleman of the family I thought I would write to you. Kiss dear papa and mind the children for me and do not let tatty henry or Bayard forget me nor do you my dearest little brother forget your ever affectionate sister -

 

Eliza Clinch

 

Transcribed by Jeffery Abalos

Comment on Papers

The Clinch Family Papers contain personal letters among kin, letters dealing with family business affairs (especially the management of estates and plantations), and letters from the military career of Duncan L. Clinch.   The transcription at left is a typical example of family correspondence--inquiries after health, brief accounts of what people are doing, with reference to other members of the family and to enslaved men or women working in the household. 

Examples of Additional Letters

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